K.E.M. Strategic Partners LLC | 35 Village Road, Suite 100 | Middleton MA 01949 | P. 978-560-3404  |  F. 978.560.1623

 
 

Caring  |   Independent   |   Practical
Financial Services

Retirement Read Time: 4 min

Immediate vs. Deferred Annuities

Despite not being as well known as some other retirement tools, annuities account for 6% of all assets earmarked for retirement. With about $2.6 trillion in assets, annuities hold more funds than Roth IRAs.1

An annuity is a contract with an insurance company. In exchange for a premium or a series of premiums, the insurance company agrees to make regular payments to the contract holder. The funds held in an annuity contract accumulate tax deferred.

For individuals interested in accumulating retirement assets, annuities can be attractive because they are not subject to contribution limits, unlike most other tax-deferred vehicles. In other words, retirement-minded individuals can set aside as much money as they would like into an annuity.

Two Phases

Immediate and Deferred Annuities

Annuity contracts pass through two distinct phases: accumulation and payout. During the accumulation phase, the funds accumulate until the annuity contract reaches its payout date. At that time, the total will either be paid out as a lump sum or as a series of payments over a period that can stretch as long as the account holder's life.

The funds attributed to the initial premium will not be taxed, but any earnings on those funds will be taxed as regular income.

Immediate Annuity

As its name implies, an immediate annuity is structured to provide current income. After paying the initial premium, an individual receives regular income, which can be deferred up to twelve months. The funds remaining in the contract accumulate on a tax-deferred basis. And only that portion of each payment attributable to interest is subject to taxes; the rest is treated as a return of principal.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax, legal, and accounting professionals before modifying your tax strategy.

Deferred Annuity

It is also possible to purchase an annuity contract that defers payout until a specific date in the future. The premiums you pay to a deferred annuity accumulate and earn interest during the accumulation phase. The annuity holder determines the amount of payments and when the payouts begin, which is usually in retirement. With a deferred annuity, the earnings credited to your contract are taxed when they are withdrawn.

Annuities have contract limitations, fees, and charges, including account and administrative fees, underlying investment management fees, mortality and expense fees, and charges for optional benefits. Most annuities have surrender fees that are usually highest if you take out the money in the initial years of the annuity contract. Withdrawals and income payments are taxed as ordinary income. If a withdrawal is made prior to age 59½, a 10% federal income tax penalty may apply (unless an exception applies). The guarantees of an annuity contract depend on the issuing company's claims-paying ability. Annuities are not guaranteed by the FDIC or any other government agency.

Variable annuities are sold by prospectus, which contains detailed information about investment objectives and risks, as well as charges and expenses. You are encouraged to read the prospectus carefully before you invest or send money to buy a variable annuity contract. The prospectus is available from the insurance company or from your financial professional. Variable annuity subaccounts will fluctuate in value based on market conditions and may be worth more or less than the original amount invested if the annuity is surrendered.

For retirement-minded investors, annuities have some attractive features that may be worth exploring. Annuities also have certain limitations and expenses that need to be considered before committing to a contract.

1. ICI.org, 2022

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

Share |
 

Related Content

Financial Fixes: The Hidden Costs of Home Ownership

Financial Fixes: The Hidden Costs of Home Ownership

Six out of 10 millennials regret buying a home because they weren’t prepared for the hidden costs.

When to Self-Insure

When to Self-Insure

Choosing to bear the financial burden of an adverse event is called self-insuring. Do you know what that entails?

Password Protection Strategies

Password Protection Strategies

Simple steps may help you foil hackers and protect your privacy.

 

Have A Question About This Topic?







Thank you! Oops!

Overlooked Ways to Add Diversity to Your Portfolio

It’s an exciting time for American investors. Recent years have seen a boom in Americans investing in the stock market, with Goldman Sachs estimating U.S. households will spend $400 billion on equities in 2021, averaging an eyebrow-raising 44% allocation of their total assets to stocks. Between new technologies (like mobile trading apps) lowering the bar to entry and “meme stock” trends raising awareness, it’s no wonder so many people are waking up to the power and potential of investing.

Mortgages in Retirement

Explore the benefits and drawbacks to paying off your mortgage prior to retirement with this article.

Financial Fixes: From Health Scare to Financial Care

A medical scare can be a wake-up call in terms of your physical and financial health. Here’s how to strengthen your finances

View all articles

Bi-Weekly Payments

This calculator estimates the savings from paying a mortgage bi-weekly instead of monthly.

Interested in a Fuel Efficient Car?

Estimate how many months it may take to recover the out-of-pocket costs when buying a more efficient vehicle.

Home Mortgage Deduction

Use this calculator to assess the potential benefits of a home mortgage deduction.

View all calculators

Principles of Preserving Wealth

How federal estate taxes work, plus estate management documents and tactics.

Your Cash Flow Statement

A presentation about managing money: using it, saving it, and even getting credit.

5 Smart Investing Strategies

There are some smart strategies that may help you pursue your investment objectives

View all presentations

When Special Care Is Needed: The Special Needs Trust

A special needs trust helps care for a special needs child when you’re gone.

Timing Your Retirement

This short video illustrates why knowing when to retire can be a crucial part of your strategy.

Bridging the Confidence Gap

In the world of finance, the effects of the "confidence gap" can be especially apparent.

View all videos